Peregrine White

Autograph_PeregrineWhite.png

BIRTH:  Late November 1620 onboard the Mayflower anchored off Provincetown Harbor.
MARRIAGE:  Sarah Bassett, sometime before 6 March 1648/9, probably at Marshfield.
CHILDREN: Daniel, unnamed child, Jonathan, Peregrine, Sarah, Sylvanus, and Mercy.
DEATH: 20 July 1704 at Marshfield.


Peregrine White was an in utero passenger on the Mayflower, and was born onboard the ship shortly after arrival in November 1620, while it was anchored in Provincetown Harbor.  He and wife Sarah lived out their lives in the town of Marshfield.  He formally joined the Marshfield Church late in life, on 22 May 1696 at the age of 78.  His death on 20 July 1704 prompted an obituary in the Boston Newsletter--the only known newspaper obituary for anyone directly associated with the Mayflower's voyage:

Marshfield, July, 22 Capt. Peregrine White of this Town, Aged Eighty three years, and Eight Months; died the 20th Instant.  He was vigorous and of a comly Aspect to the last; Was the Son of Mr. William White and Susanna his Wife; born on board the Mayflower, Capt. Jones Commander, in Cape Cod Harbour, November, 1620.  Was the First Englishman born in New-England.  Altho' he was in the former part of his Life extravagant; yet was much Reform'd in his last years; and died hopefully.
This cradle is believed to have been brought on the Mayflower by William and Susanna White, for the use of Peregrine White, who was born onboard the ship in November 1620 while it was anchored off the tip of Cape Cod.  It is on display at the Pilgrim Hall Museum in Plymouth.

This cradle is believed to have been brought on the Mayflower by William and Susanna White, for the use of Peregrine White, who was born onboard the ship in November 1620 while it was anchored off the tip of Cape Cod.  It is on display at the Pilgrim Hall Museum in Plymouth.

An drawing from about 1846 of an apple tree said to have been planted by Peregrine White on his property in Marshfield.  By 1851, only the "right hand branch" was still standing, the rest had decayed and was cut away.  The shoot was reportedly still standing in 1901 but had died by 1914.